The New Testament and Bird Box

One of my goals for 2018 had been to read through the entire Bible, a goal I did not complete. However, this morning I finished my NT read through with the book of Revelation.

It was interesting timing because yesterday I watched Bird Box, a recent Netflix movie set in an apocalypse. The main idea is that there is some sort of evil demon monster that causes people to commit suicide if they see it. Quite graphic, disturbing, and the characters spend much of the movie blindfolded.

So as I was reading about the end of time in the Bible I was making these connections between plagues, Satan run amok, angelic hosts and the woe to those humans unfortunate enough to live through the terrible end of Earth as we know it. Mildly amusing and entirely unexpected.

This reminds me that our current experiences in life, with art, and other factors can influence the lens with which we approach other arts, in this case my Bible reading. I’ll revisit this goal again in 2019 and should meet it this time.

Reflections on Generation Me

I’ve finished my second book by Dr. Jean Twenge about generations. The title Generation Me is another name for Millenials, also known as Gen Y. The short version is that Gen Me is at its core very focused on the self. Believe in yourself. You can do anything and essentially narcissistic, even compared to other American generations.

I found it to also be a quick and compelling read. This generation is now roughly the age of 22-37 and makes up the majority of young adults in America now, including a significant part of the workforce. I’m still mentally transitioning to the fact that students these days are no longer Millennials but are the younger iGen, AKA Gen Z.

I think a key difference between the two generations (Y & Z) are that the older ones (Y) believe in themselves and are self-focused, while the younger generation (Z) are distracted and living primarily through digital-based social media. They both are missing out on real community and personal relationships compared to older generations, but for different reasons. My personal opinion is that this is one of the few key factors contributing to their disenchantments.

This wraps up my generational book reading for this year and I’ll be focused on finishing Isaac Asimov’s Foundation heptalogy. After that it will be 2019 and I can focus on my main reading goal for next year: establish a foundation of modern English literature by reading the works of Shakespeare, the 1662 Book of Common Prayer and the 1611 KJV bible.

Reflections on Foundation by Asimov

This past summer I started reading many of the works by Isaac Asimov for the first time. He has three major series and I read the first two this summer. They were quite good, and his final series was originally a trilogy. It is actually expanded to seven books and I finished the first one last week.

Foundation is the third book chronologically, in the series, but was the first one written. I decided to read the books in the order written rather than in the internal narrative chronology. I’m happy with this decision and Foundation was not what I expected.

The unique thing about Foundation is that the story takes place over a very long period of time. Chapters or books in the series may continue directly after the previous chapter or they may skip ahead in time by decades or centuries.

This was disorienting at first, but I see now that this is the whole point of the story. To relate the story of the rise and fall of an entire civilization that spans a galaxy, much time must be covered in the narrative.

An interesting side effect of this is that main characters in one chapter may become heroes of old, generations removed, in the next chapter and with new characters!

I’ve already started book two and am half way through it. I plan to zip through these remaining books quickly so that I can focus on my reading goals come 2019. My starting place is the works of Shakespeare alongside the King James Bible (1611) and the Book of Common Prayer (1662) to give me a foundation in modern English works.

English Literature

I’ve spent most of 2018 reflecting on my use of media and what sort of goals, if any, I should establish for myself for this year, or the next. To that end, I have decided to pursue a literary review of the pillars of modern English. I have decided to blog about my reading of the works Shakespeare, the King James Bible (1611) and the Book of Common Prayer (1662). From this starting point, I will delve into other classic works. I won’t be limiting myself to English authors only, and am anticipating reading some works of Tolstoy, in addition to Dickens, etc. I tend to naturally blog about topics related to my various other hobbies, and I am sure they will make an appearance once more. So, here is to a renewal in my blogging activities, which I have neglected for far too long. I will close with an excerpt from The Valley of Vision.

“Open to me the springs of divine knowledge,
sparkling like crystal,
flowing clear and unsullied
through my wilderness of life.”

The Arts

I’ve spent the last seven months or so exploring watercolor. This month I’ve branched out into gouache as well (an opaque watercolor medium). I have always enjoyed drawing in pencil, and have tried drawing in ink once more. I’ve even revisited chalk pastels but didn’t enjoy them at the time, and I’ve toyed with the idea of other paint mediums, mainly acrylic and oil.

Two years ago I deleted my first blog of ten years Continue reading “The Arts”